Grandfathered Review S1:E17

Everyone’s talking about the new show Grandfathered, which first aired in September and stars some of our favorite former television actors, John Stamos and Josh Peck. Even though the cast is what initially drew me to the show, the show’s humorous characters and unusual storyline are what made me, like many others, keep watching it.

            Grandfathered follows the life of a fifty-year-old bachelor and successful restaurant owner, played by John Stamos, who finds out he has a twenty-five year old son, Gerald, and a granddaughter, Edie. With the sudden appearance of a family he never knew he had, Jimmy Martino is forced to grow up at the ripe age of fifty to fulfill his new role of father and grandfather. He struggles to become a family man while still retaining the unpredictability and freedom of his old life. His attempts at blending those two personas lead to a comical array of disasters and a meaningful realization that sometimes life throws you what you need instead of what you think you want (or at least he’s getting there).

            Gerald, played by Josh Peck, is also forced to grow up after meeting the father he never knew. He was a struggling tech whiz with a kid, who lived at home with his mother, and while he continues to struggle and live with his mother, he becomes more ambitious and courageous after Jimmy enters his life.

            In this episode, Jimmy’s feelings for Sara, Gerald’s mother, become transparent to the audience when she asks him to pretend to be her boyfriend at a friend’s engagement party and he takes pretending a little too far in a way only he can. At the end of the episode, they’re both too emotionally stunted to realize their feelings for each other, but their more than friendly relationship leaves the audience in anticipation for what’s to come.

            Grandfathered has all the makings of a great show: quirky humor, wit, and John Stamos! Jimmy Martino is no ordinary grandfather, and this is no ordinary show.

By Elizabeth Pisakhova

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